Mike Studer, the Tennessee state apiarist, reports that a case of American foulbrood was recently found in a hive in Sullivan County in Upper East Tennessee.

American foulbrood is one of the worst things that can happen to a hive, and it usually results in the hive — bees and all — having to be burned. The reason it has to be destroyed in this way is so it won’t spread to other hives.

Studer, in the Tennessee Beekeepers Association newsletter The Hive Tool, said the foulbrood was probably the result of a beekeeper acquiring and using old equipment.

“Please do not use someone’s old equipment,” Studer says.  “It can cost you a lot more than buying new equipment.”

American foulbrood is something that we discuss quite a bit at our beekeepers meetings, but, fortunately, it doesn’t occur that often. Varroa is the number one pest we have to deal with. Still, we should always be careful with our hives and not bring undue problems on ourselves or our bees.

Mike Studer’s full contact information is below in case you ever need him.

Michael D. Studer

State Apiarist

Tennessee Department of Agriculture

Division of Consumer and Industry Services

Apiary Section

Ellington Agricultural Center

Box 40627, Melrose Station

436 Hogan Road, Porter Bldg.

Nashville, TN 37204

Office: 615-837-5342

Cell: 615-517-4451

Fax: 615-837-5246

E-Mail: mike.studer@tn.gov

Web Page: http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/regulatory/apiary.shtml

And here’s a video from New Zealand, of all places, on American foulbrood:

 

Key words: Mike Studer, Tennessee State apiarist, American foulbrood, bee diseases, beekeeping in Tennessee, beehives

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