Coal ash spill in Kingston, Tenn. (Tennessee Valley Authority)

Coal ash spill in Kingston, Tenn. (Tennessee Valley Authority)

EarthJustice.org, one of the nation’s largest environmental protection law firms, is claiming victory in its fight to regulate coal ash dumping.

Here’s part of a recent announcement:

For nearly 6 years, we have pressured the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), the White House and our elected officials to protect thousands of communities and millions of Americans from the toxic threat of coal ash. During that time, coal ash has continued to spill into rivers and poison drinking water supplies. Some coal ash dumpsites, if they fail, would flood nearby communities, likely killing anyone in their paths.

But on December 19, we will celebrate our biggest victory. Thanks to a lawsuit by Earthjustice, and because of your actions to pressure decision makers, the EPA is under a court-ordered deadline to finalize the first-ever federal safeguards for coal ash. Millions of tons of this unregulated waste must finally be cleaned up, and power companies will need to take steps to ensure that their waste pits are safe. (quoted material)

It was six years ago when the nation’s most devastating coal ash spill occurred in Kingston, Tenn., just a few miles west of us here in Blount County. Environmentalists cite this incident as a mammoth environmental disaster.

EarthJustice.org has also taken a leading role in trying to persuade the EPA to ban neonicotinoids in pesticides. Studies are piling up that show neonics are harmful to honeybees, but the EPA refuses to move away from its approval of these pesticides.

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EarthJustice.org

EarthJustice.org

Key words: EarthJustice.org, coal ash, Environmental Protection Agency, environment, environmental regulation,  neonicotinoids, neonics, pesticides, honeybees, coal ash spill in Kingston

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