Bittman’s at it again.

Mark Bittman, a food writer for the New York Times, wants to change the way you eat. He wants to change the entire food system, too. The way we produce, distribute and consume food.

But that’s impossible, so he’s having to content himself with telling us how we should eat, what we should eat, and how we should think about food.

(Typical, isn’t it, of those liberal know-it-alls who produce and read the New York Times.)

The thing is, I agree with him.

He’s put out another column saying he had only — ONLY — two rules for us to follow (maybe three):

1. Stop eating junk and hyperprocessed food. This eliminates probably 80 percent of the stuff that is being sold as “food.”

2. Eat more plants than you did yesterday, or last year.

If you add “Cook your own food” to this list, it’s even more powerful, but these two steps alone allow you to reduce the amount of antibiotics you’re consuming; pretty much eliminate GMOs from your diet, lighten your carbon footprint; reduce your chances of becoming ill as a result of your diet; save money; cut way back on sugar, other junk and unnecessary and potentially harmful nonfood additives; and so on. (quoted material)

Bittman makes some point points in his column that are well worth reading.

So what does this have to do with beekeeping?

Well, just about everything. Bees are central to our food system. And that system is abusing them terribly. We truck them across the country to pollinate crops that are grown in places that cannot sustain bees. Then we truck them home.

So, who would argue that our system of food production doesn’t need changing?

Bittman is showing us a way to start.

Related articles:

Marla Spivak on why we are in a honeybee crisis

Changing the food system, one mouth at a time

Key words: Mark Bittman, New York Times, food system, junk food, beekeeping, honeybees, pollination, food production, rules for diet, liberal know-it-alls who produce and read the New York Times,

 

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