You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Blount County Beekeepers Association’ tag.


The regular meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association will be on Monday, July 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Blount County public library. The main topic on the program will be mead and how to make it out of your honey.

In addition, beekeepers can bring a sample of honey to have it tested for moisture content. Howard Kerr, a BCBA member and veteran beekeeper, will bring the testing equipment and has offered to test the honey of anyone who brings recently extracted honey to the meeting.

Honey should have about 19 percent or less water content to be considered real honey, and sometimes, with our humid days, it is difficult to determine the exact percentage. Howard will give us some insight about that on Monday

We’ll also have some information about how the CSX train derailment and evacuation has affected Blount County beekeepers.

Advertisements

Getting your honey of the hive — how does that happen?

And then what do you do with all that golden stuff​?

Those will be the questions we will be tackling at the next meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association. One of our members, Coley O’Dell, will talk about harvesting and marketing honey, and another member, John Gee, will give us a demonstration on extracting honey.

Dennis Barry will be presenting the seasonal management discussion.

The meeting will be Monday, June 8, at 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Blount County Library.

If you have questions about what your bees are doing this time of year, this next BCBA meeting would be a great place to get some answers.

As always, our meetings are free and open to the public. Invite a friend to come along with you.

Even if the friend isn’t interested in becoming a beekeeper, we always have lively, friendly discussions about what we should be doing with our bees.

And, if you aren’t doing this already, you should check out BlountBees.com on a regular basis. Better yet, you should go to the site and sign up for an email subscription (free, of course). You will get an email every time we post something new to the site.


The Blount County Beekeepers Association’s March meeting will cover the practical topics of supering (putting boxes on your hives) and installing packages of bees.

The meeting will be Monday, March 9, at 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Blount County Library.

Bill Manuel will lead the discussion on supering, and Bob Landers will demonstrate the proper way to install a package of bees. Luke Newman will talk about seasonal management.

If you have questions about what your bees are doing this time of year, the next BCBA meeting would be a great place to get some answers.

As always, our meetings are free and open to the public. Invite a friend to come along with you. Even if the friend isn’t interested in becoming a beekeeper, we always have lively, friendly discussions about what we should be doing with our bees.


Many of the viruses now being discovered in beehives are introduced by the varroa destructor, according to Philip Moore, a bee researcher at the University of Tennessee.

Philip Moore

Philip Moore

Moore spoke to the November meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association on Nov. 10 on emerging trends in honeybee health. The picture he painted is not a pretty one for bees or beekeepers.

There are more than 20 viruses that researchers are looking at that infect beehives, he said. Most of these — though not all — are introduced into the hives by varroa.

Moore made the following points during his talk:

  • For most of the viruses, a beekeeper is going to be unaware that they are there. When the hive starts showing symptoms of having a virus, it’s usually too late to do anything about it.
  • Beekeepers should be careful about taking frames from weak hives and putting them in strong hives. Doing this often brings viruses into the strong hive.
  • Beekeepers should inspect their hives regularly for any unusual activity or unusual-looking bees. These are indicators that something is wrong with the hive.
  • The most important thing a beekeeper can do to fight viruses is to try to keep the varroa levels in the hive at a minimum.
  • Some types of bees, such as Africanized bees or Russian bees, exhibit behaviors that help them fight varroa.

Moore said more information about all of this can be found at the University’s website: http://www.extension.org/bee_health.

Here’s an article that Moore co-authored with Michael Wilson, Dr. John Skinner about beehive viruses: http://www.extension.org/pages/71172/honey-bee-viruses-the-deadly-varroa-mite-associates#.VGM63vTF_fY

Key words: honeybees, beehives, bee health, Philip Moore, varroa, varroa destructor, beehive viruses, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Blount County Beekeepers Association, Russian bees, Africanized bees, beehive inspection, John Skinner, Michael Wilson


Good beekeeping involves planning for two or three seasons ahead, according to Michael Wilson, a bee researcher at the University of Tennessee.

Wilson spoke to the November meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association on Nov. 10 on “overwintering” and said that any plans a beekeeper has for overwintering bees should start in the spring of the year. Now is the time to plan for spring and summer.

Michael Wilson at RosecombApiaries

Michael Wilson at RosecombApiaries

Wilson also made the following points during his talk:

  • As winter approaches, it is best to feed solid food, such as a mixture of sugar with small amounts of water. Because we experience warm days in November and even December, sugar water can possibly ferment in the hive even this late in the year.
  • Don’t overfeed. Hives can become “honey-bound;” that is, they will fill all the cells with honey, and the queen will have no place to lay eggs.
  • Much of the research about good beekeeping practices will have to be done by beekeepers. “It’s hard for us (in schools of agriculture) to get money to do that.” However, according to Wilson, through the Bee Informed Partnership (beeinformed.org) Universities and the USDA work to better enable beekeepers to evaluate their beekeeping practices so they can make better management decisions based on objective measures in their own apiaries and comparisons among other beekeepers.
  • New techniques and equipment are being developed for monitoring what is going on in the hive. He referred to SolutionBee and Arina, which produce hive monitoring equipment

Wilson’s website is RosecombApiaries.com.

Key words: bees, honeybees, beehives, overwintering bees, Michael Wilson, UT Institute of Agriculture, honey-bound hives, research on beekeeping, Blount County Beekeepers Association, SolutionBee, Arnia


The November meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association will feature the topics of overwintering bees and bee health.

Michael Wilson

Michael Wilson

We’ll be hearing presentations from University of Tennessee researchers Michael Wilson, who will discuss proper overwintering practices for beekeepers, and Phillip Moore, who will talk about how to protect the health of your bees.

John McDade will present the seasonal management portion of the program.

The meeting, which will be on Monday, November 10, at 6:30 p.m. in the Blount County Library.

Phillip Moore

Phillip Moore

Michael and Phillip are on the research staff of UT’s Entomology and Plant Pathology Department and work closely with Dr. John Skinner, the state apiculturalist. This will be an informative session you won’t want to miss.

If you have questions about what your bees are doing this time of year, the next BCBA meeting would be a great place to get some answers.

As always, our meetings are free and open to the public. Invite a friend to come along with you. Even if the friend isn’t interested in becoming a beekeeper, we always have lively, friendly discussions about our bees.

Related sites

Blount County Beekeepers Association

Beekeeping expert Tew talks about bees and their environment at August BCBA meeting

 

Key words: Blount County Beekeepers Association, overwintering bees, honeybee health, Michael Wilson, Phillip Moore, John Skinner, University of Tennessee Entomology and Plant Pathology Department


The annual Blount County Beekeepers Association Christmas Party will be on Dec. 8 at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church on Sandy Springs Road. The time is 6:30 p.m.

We have special entertainment planned for this year: Off Kilter, a musical ensemble from Maryville College. This group gets rave reviews wherever it performs, and the students should provide us with a lot of fun.

The cost of the dinner is $12.50 per person. Checks should be given to our treasurer Bernie McGraw at the November meeting. If you can’t make it to the meeting, you can mail your check to Bernie at

Bernie McGraw
1220 Havenwood Drive
Maryville, TN 37804

Off Kilter is a performing group of Maryville College students who sing a variety of songs and styles. They perform under the direction of Coordinator of Choral Music Stacey Wilner.

If you want a pre-party taste of what they do, here are a couple of YouTube videos:

 

 

Key words: Blount County Beekeepers Association, Christmas Party, bees, beekeeping, Off Kilter, Maryville College, Stacey Wilner


The annual auction of the last night raised $1,514.50 for our grants and scholarships fund.

Maggie McDade shows off one of the items for sale during the annual BCBA auction at the October meeting.

Maggie McDade shows off one of the items for sale during the annual BCBA auction at the October meeting.

Members and friends of the BCBA contributed dozens of items, mostly bee related but some not, to the auction, and we had a grand time in seeing them go up for bits.

Several members expressed appreciation to those who contributed and to all who made bids.

In other action last night, the membership approved a slate of officer nominees for the 2015 year. Those nominees include the following:

President: Harlen Breeden

Vice president: Bill Manuel

Secretary: John McDade

Treasurer: Bernie McGraw

Alternate officer: Jim Stovall

Board of directors: Mike Berry (one year), Travis Benson (two years), Luke Newman (three years)

Related articles

About the Blount County Beekeepers Association


The annual auction will be the main event for the October meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association.

The meeting, which will be on Monday, October 13, at 6:30 p.m. in the Blount County Library.

The money from the auction goes to support the grants the BCBA gives to those who want to begin beekeeping or who have good ideas for promoting beekeeping in this area of East Tennessee.

In years past members have been generous in donating items for the auction, and we are looking forward to the same for this year. Items do not necessarily have to be bee-related, but they should be new or in very good shape. We are also likely to have items donated from a number of bee suppliers.

So, bring what you have, and then get ready to bid on what you want. It’s always a fun time for everyone.

If you have questions about what your bees are doing this time of year, the next BCBA meeting would be a great place to get some answers.

As always, our meetings are free and open to the public. Invite a friend to come along with you. Even if the friend isn’t interested in becoming a beekeeper, we always have lively, friendly discussions about what we should be doing with our bees.

 

Related articles

About the Blount County Beekeepers Association

BCBA members show off beekeeping, honey at Blue Ribbon Country Fair

BCBA’s booth at the Maryville’s Farmers Market, August 0214


More than 850 Blount County students and teachers saw first-hand what beekeeping is like during the Blount Farm Tour earlier this month.

That exposure to bees came through the efforts of Blount County Beekeepers Association members Harlen Breeden, Pat Breeden, Darlene Parton and Charlie Parton. They were helped by UT grad student Heather Lowry, who is an assistant to Dr. John Skinner.

Below are pictures, courtesy of Harlen:

 

 

x

IMG_0650 IMG_0651 IMG_0652

x

Read the rest of this entry »

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 231 other followers

Join us

If you're interested in joining the Blount County Beekeepers Association, call

Chuck Davis
865-566-3690

or

Mark Ford
865-603-2016

Welcome

Welcome to the web site of the Blount County Beekeepers Association in Maryville, Tennessee.

This site will tell you a little about the association and how to become a member. It will also tell you a little about beekeeping.

Bees are an important part of our environment and particularly our agricultural system. They are also fascinating creatures.

We hope you will be interested enough to join us at some point, even if you're not interested in keeping bees. There are lots of ways you can join in with what we do.

Follow us on Twitter at @blountbees.

Schedule of BCBA meetings for 2017

The Blount County Beekeepers Association meets on the second Monday of every month, except for September and December, at 6:30 p.m. at the Maryville Church of Christ, 611 Sherwood Drive in Maryville.

All of the meetings are open to the public, and anyone interested in learning more about beekeeping is welcome and encouraged to attend.

The following is the schedule of meetings and activities for 2017:

January 9 – regular meeting

February 13 – regular meeting

February 18 – BCBA short course for new beekeepers

March 11 – New Beekeeper Classes

March 13 – regular meeting

March 18 -Wooden Ware class

April 10 – regular meeting

April 29-
Field Day for new beekeepers

May 8 – regular meeting

June 12 – regular meeting

July 10 – regular meeting

August 14 – regular meeting

October 9 – regular meeting

November 13 – regular meeting

December 11 – Christmas dinner

%d bloggers like this: