New thoughts about old comb


If you look at most any list of “best beekeeping practices,” you will probably find this item: Remove old comb from the hive and replace it on a regular basis. It’s one of those items that gives people like us — who are trying to be good beekeepers — a guilty conscience. We may removeContinue reading “New thoughts about old comb”

The ‘social mobility’ of worker bees


This won’t be any surprise to beekeepers or people who know anything about bees: About 20 percent of the worker bees do most of the foraging. And when these foraging bees need to be replaced, other workers step into those roles. This short video (1:32) from the New York Times makes that point and showsContinue reading “The ‘social mobility’ of worker bees”

Bees need water: a video by Jim Tew


We recently posted a short piece on the fact that bees need water, and it’s up to the beekeeper to make sure they have it. This is a good follow-up to that post — especially since it reminds us that bees need water, no matter what season of the year. The video below has ourContinue reading “Bees need water: a video by Jim Tew”

Jim Tew describes the inside of a feral beehive


What’s the inside of a natural beehive like? According to beekeeping expert, it’s quite different from the hives that we construct for our bees. In the video below, Tew draws out the comparison. Tew spoke to the Blount County Beekeepers Association  on Aug. 11, 2014), and the five-minute video segment below is part of one of hisContinue reading “Jim Tew describes the inside of a feral beehive”

Tew: the natural hive is not a ‘permanent’ home for bees


Bees build hives in trees and elsewhere without the thought that this will be their “permanent” home, according to beekeeping expert Jim Tew. Tew spoke to the Blount County Beekeepers Association August meeting on Aug. 11. One of his presentations concerned why colonies are “stressed,” and in explaining that he talked about what happens whenContinue reading “Tew: the natural hive is not a ‘permanent’ home for bees”

Tew: Beekeeping is different from what it was 30 years ago


Beekeeping is different from what it was 30 years ago, and bees seem to need a lot more “babysitting.” Beekeeping expert and author Jim Tew made that point at the beginning of his second presentation to the Blount County Beekeepers Association on Monday, Aug. 11, 2014. (Read our article published just after his presentation.) BelowContinue reading “Tew: Beekeeping is different from what it was 30 years ago”

The responsibilities of a beekeeper


Jim Tew’s presentations to the Blount County Beekeepers Association meeting on Monday provoked my thinking about the responsibilities we take on when we call ourselves beekeepers. So just what are those responsibilities? To my mind, there are three: Providing a home for the bees . . . . . . as long as they willContinue reading “The responsibilities of a beekeeper”

Beekeeping expert Tew talks about bees and their environment at August BCBA meeting


Jim Tew told Blount County beekeepers that the environment for bees is a complicated one, and not every plant a bee visits is good for it — and some plants can be downright dangerous. “So much of this (the environment for bees) is so complicated, that it’s a wonder that bees can do anything at all,”Continue reading “Beekeeping expert Tew talks about bees and their environment at August BCBA meeting”

Jim Tew, well-known expert on beekeeping, to speak at August meeting  


A nationally known bee expert will headline the August meeting of the Blount County Beekeepers Association. Jim Tew, currently the beekeeping specialist for the Alabama Cooperative Extension Service, will be the main speaker at the meeting, which will be on Monday, August 11, at 6:30 p.m. in the Blount County Library. Jim has been aroundContinue reading “Jim Tew, well-known expert on beekeeping, to speak at August meeting  “