A panacea for hives with queen problems from Michael Bush


Michael Bush, author of The Practical Beekeeper, and strong advocate of non-chemical beekeeping (and someone we have quoted here before), says there is a single solution to almost all queen problems in a hive: There are few solutions as universal in their application and their success than adding a frame of open brood and eggsContinue reading “A panacea for hives with queen problems from Michael Bush”

A different view of swarms


Beekeepers spend a lot of mental and physical energy trying to prevent swarms. A hive that swarms is less productive in making honey than a hive that doesn’t, particularly if the swarm occurs during a honey flow. But, maybe we should stop, take a moment, and consider the good that a swarm can do. First,Continue reading “A different view of swarms”

Best Beekeeping Practices Q & A: Dale Hinkle


Dale Hinkle keeps bees in Monroe County but often makes the trek to Blount County where he is a vital part of the Blount County Beekeepers Association. He is the association treasurer, a position that he has held for several years. Dale is one of the few beekeepers in the area to raise his ownContinue reading “Best Beekeeping Practices Q & A: Dale Hinkle”

Howard Kerr on bees: They are what they eat


You are what you eat; so are the bees. An egg gets hormone-rich royal jelly for about three days, but then the nurse bees most of the time stop feeding that. If a bee continues to get royal jelly, she could develop into a queen.